Courses

Darchei Binah Course Offerings

Issues in Israeli Life (1-0-1)

Delve into issues which reflect the historical roots and current stance of political and societal infrastructure in modern Israeli life. The make-up of the Knesset, power of the Supreme Court, Nachal Chareidi, Hesder Yeshivot, Sherut Leumi, … .

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Talmudic Insights into the Weekly Bible Portion (1-0-1)

Selected topics from the weekly Bible portion as seen through the light of the Talmud and the medieval Talmudic commentaries.

Course requirements: Pass/fail course. Attendance required.

Introduction to Midrash (1-1-2)

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the methodology and the meaning of Midrash. Emphasis on acquiring tools to analyze and understand midrash of different types, including the parable, the “story midrash,” and the concordance midrash. Supervised chavruta preparation integrated into course.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

Foundations of the Oral Tradition (1-0-1)

The Torah its origins and transmission. Focus on the revelation and unfolding of both the Written and Oral Law.

Course Requirements: Final exam per semester.

Legends and Aggadot Yalkut Shimoni (2-0-2)

The anthology, Yalkut Shimoni, was edited by Rabbi Simon the Darshan of Frankfurt. This anthology contains citations from all existent forms of the Oral Tradition including the Babylonian Talmud, Midrash Rabah, Midrash Tanhuma, Pirkei Derabi Eliezer and is organized according to biblical verse. This course is designed to give students familiarity with both the design and the contents of specified portions of the Yalkut.

Course Requirements: Final exam per semester.

Ein Yaakov: Legends (Aggadah) of the Talmud (1-0-1)

Continuation of OT101;102. The methodology of the aggadah; the aggadah as the expression of the rabbis in fundamentals of faith; analysis of the talmudic text.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester

Advanced Midrash (1-1-2)

Ein Ayah (2-0-2)

Rabbi A. I. Kook’s monumental commentary on the Ein Yaakov. Focus on Tractata Brachot. The Rabbis maintain that a person’s quest for fear of heaven should lead him to the legends of the Talmud. In his unique fashion, Rabbi Kook paints a lofty but very real picture of man, the commandments, and the world.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Stages of Spiritual Growth: A Depth Psychology of Personal Development (2-0-2)

This course defines spiritual growth, and analyzes the psychological issues that impact upon it: What constitutes spiritual growth? What self knowledge and psychological skills must I acquire, if I am to accomplish my spiritual task in this world? What are the underlying philosophical axioms of non-Jewish culture that sabotage my psychological health and my spiritual growth? As we answer these questions, we will find that spiritual growth follows a predictable sequence, and we will provide a comprehensive philosophical system which explains why this is so.

The textual foundation of this philosophical system includes some Midrash and Aggadata, as well as Torah thought of modern times, as expressed by Rabbi Chayim of Volozhin, Rabbi S.R. Hirsch, Rabbi Tzadok HaCohen, Rabbi Kook, the Chazon Ish, Rabbi Dessler, Rabbi Hutner, and Rabbi Soloveitchik, among others. The relevant texts will be studied in class.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester.

The Psychology of Education (1-0-1)

Analysis of social and physical factors and their influence on attitudes in the classroom; discussion of current educational trends and their soundness in the classroom; classroom management and discipline; theories of learning and methods of teaching; the psychology of early childhood and adolescence.

Course requirements: Videoed model lesson, term paper

Teaching Practicum (1-1-1)

Classroom observation and student teaching for those students who wish to obtain a teaching certificate.
Course requirements: Classroom observation and model lessons.

Relationships (1-0-1)

Course designed to offer tools on topics related to personal growth and development as students enter adulthood: Discovering your Personal Learning Style. Body image, diet and health. Emotional intelligence and self esteem. “It’s all about relationships”. Understanding depression, addiction, abuse, stress, anxiety, bereavement and other topics in coping with adult life.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required

Matches and Mates (1-0-1)

Classic Jewish psychological and philosophical attitudes relating to the search for and choice of one’s life mate. Guidelines for the establishment of a Jewish home based on the wisdom and words of the rabbis in the Talmud.

Course requirements: Pass/fail course. Attendance required.

Seminar in Outreach Techniques (1-1-2)

A series of lectures given by preeminent outreach professionals on basic principles of teaching and programming for the Jewish community at large. Seminar will include fieldwork in organizations dedicated to outreach (kiruv rechokim).

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Derech Hashem (1-0-1)

Principles of Jewish philosophy as systematized by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzatto; exposition of basic issues including the purpose of creation, the suffering of the righteous, the relationship between the Jewish and gentile nations; explanation of mystical concepts including higher worlds, astrology, angels, sorcery, dreams.

Course requirements: Term paper.

Selected Topics in Jewish Philosophy (1-0-1)

In depth, practical examination of a person’s relationship with himself, with society, and with G-d; emphasis placed on midrashic and Talmudic sources with the interpretations of both earlier and later commentaries.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Tefilla Text (1-0-1)

Course will examine the structure, history, and development of Jewish liturgy over the ages including the philosophical and ethical ideas that the liturgy embodies.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Modern Jewish Thought (1-0-1)

An analysis of subjects relevant to contemporary Jewish thinking through the vehicle of modern folk tales.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Messilat Yesharim – The Path of the Just (2-0-2)

An analysis of this classic work of ethical teachings, developing the themes through the eyes of the Rabbis in the Oral Tradition.

Course requirements: Periodic quizzes. Final exam per semester.

The Wisdom of the Woman and the Home (1-0-1)

Concepts and personality characteristics relevant to the Jewish woman, wife, and mother.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

Kuzari (1-0-1)

The book of arguments and proof in defense of the despised faith by Rabbi Yehuda Halevi. Course outline includes: historical background of the book and its author; conversion of the Khazars. The debate with the philosopher; the debate with the Christian cleric; the debate with the Islamic scholar; the debate with the rabbi; UFO’s; Mormons and Sunday morning television; Revelation or magic mushrooms; the chosen; the World to Come; the Names of G-d; the Temple and the sacrifices; the Oral Law: tradition or invention?.

Course requirements: One term paper per semester.

Maharal; Netzach Yisrael (1-0-1)

Netzach Yisrael is a profound understanding of Jewish History in the light of the Rabbis. Course focuses on defining the relationship between the destruction of the Temple and the ultimate redemption.

Course Requirements: Final exam per semester.

Letting G-D Run Your Life (1-0-1)

This course will analyze the extent of one’s obligation to make an effort or, in contrast, to rely on Divine Providence in various areas of life. These include making a living, choosing a life mate, the peace process, interpersonal relationships…
Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required

Life Perspectives (1-0-1)

Specific issues relevant to the modern day Jew addressed from a Torah perspective.

Course Requirements: Pass/fail course. Attendance required.

13 Principles of Faith (1-0-1)

Intensive analysis of fundamentals of faith and pedagogical approach to teaching these fundamentals in the classroom. Topics include G-d as the creator, G-d as all knowing, reward and punishment, fundamentals of prayer, fundamentals of prophecy, Torah as divine, the coming of the Messiah, the resurrection of the dead.

The Philosophy of the Sabbath (1-0-1)

Inner meaning of the Sabbath as a reflection of fundamentals of faith. Based on the classic work of Rabbi S. D. Pincus.

Course requirements:

Honors Seminar: Torah Philosophy of Modern Times Selected Topics (2-0-2)

Reading from philosophers of modern times, we will encounter unconventional twists on the following topics in Torah thought: the nature of creativity and its connection to love; the search for spirituality; the psychological trap of being judgmental; male and female mindsets; our unconscious minds; the debate over intrinsic holiness and the chosenness of the Jewish people; the layered nature of Truth.

We will read texts by authors such as R. Tzadok HaCohen, the Meshech Chochmah, Rabbi Kook, Rabbi Hutner, Rabbi Soloveitchik, and Rabbi Wolbe.

This seminar is open to both first and second year students.

Alei Shor (1-0-1)

Psychological insights into positive attitude, dealing with depression, and experiencing true joy based on the writings of Rabbi Shlomo Volbe.

Course requirements: Term paper or exam per semester.

Philosophy Texts of Modern Times (2-0-2)

This course is designed to teach students to read and analyze difficult philosophy texts from the modern period. Selections include: Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, Rabbi Chaim from Volozhin, Chassidic masters, leaders of the mussar movement, as well as sui generis thinkers such as Rabbi Zadok HaCohen, Rabbi Kook, Rabbi Hutner, and Rabbi J.B. Soloveitchik.
Course requirements: Final exam per semester.

Selected Topics in Jewish Philosophy (1-0-1)

A continuation of JPH103;104. In depth practical examination of a person’s relationship with himself, with society, and with G-d; emphasis placed on midrashic and Talmudic sources with the interpretations of both earlier and later commentaries.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Ethics of the Fathers (1-0-1)

A textual analysis of the mishnaic tractate “Ethics of our Fathers” with the commentary “Derech Chaim” of Rabbi Yehudah Lowe. Emphasis placed on understanding of each individual mishna as well as its place in context within the entire chapter. Practical application of its teachings will be given full consideration.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

Messilat Yesharim – The Path of the Just (2-0-2)

Continuation of PSY107;108. An analysis of this classic work of ethical teachings, developing the themes through the eyes of the Rabbis in the Oral Tradition.

Course requirements: Periodic quizzes. Final exam per semester.

Moadim – The Inner World of the Jewish Holidays

Class designed to enable students to utilize the yearly cycle as a framework for divine service through an in depth analysis of the Sabbath and Holidays.

The Writings of Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler (1-0-1)

Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler as a bridge between the cultivation of the inner life and the communal issues of the time. Some of the major themes to be expounded include the issues of Torah and worldly pursuit, Zionism and the State of Israel, the range of free choice, and an understanding of biblical personalities.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required

The Ethical Teachings of Rabbi Chaim Shmulevitz (1-0-1)

Classic ethical teachings based on the weekly bible portion.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required

Advanced Kuzari (1-0-1)

Continuation of JPH117;118

Course requirements: Final examination

Nefesh HaChaim (2-0-2)

Man’s deeds are not just here today and gone a moment later. They impact the cosmos. Learn how that happens through the unique approach of the × ×¤×© החיים.

Course requirements: Final examination per semester.

Sfas Emes (1-0-1)

Chassidic love from the Sfas Emes. Recurrent themes in his writings and discovery of roots of these themes in the works of his predecessors: the Rebbes of Pshischa, Kotzk, and the Chidushei Harim.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Effective Prayer (1-0-1)

Philosophy of prayer; the G-d/man relationship; the roots of prayer; the approach of Rabbi Isaac Luria.
Man in prayer; including attention techniques, preparation for prayer.

Course requirements: In class essay, final examination.

Two semester course. Credit only given for students who stay both semesters.

Prayer (1-0-1)

Various prayer texts as they are utilized to highlight changes in the yearly holiday cycle. Daily prayer, holiday prayer, prayers associated with the High Holy Days, and prayers of grief and consolation.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Effective Prayer II (1-0-1)

An in-depth study of the various segments of the daily liturgy from the prayer book itself. Analysis of the unique characteristics of Sabbath and Festival Prayers.

Laws of Blessings (2-0-2)

The derivation of the laws relating to blessings from the Talmud through the early codifiers; the opinions stated in modern legal and responsa literature including the Mishnah Brurah, Igrot Moshe, Veten Bracha, Sefer Pitchei Halacha.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

Jewish Dietary Laws (2-0-2)

A comprehensive study of the dietary laws, their history and development; legal principles and their application to daily situations.

Course requirements: Regularly scheduled exams, final examination.

Laws of the Sabbath (2-0-2)

The derivation of practical law from classical sources with emphasis on application to common problems and situations.

Course requirements: Regularly scheduled exams, final examination.

The Concept of Modesty in Jewish Law (1-0-1)

A textually oriented course which incorporates both philosophy and law to arrive at a proper understanding of the concept of modesty as it relates to a Jewish woman.

Course requirements: One research assignment, one exam per semester.

Modern Legal Problems (1-0-1)

Analysis of legal problems which are currently of special interest; the application of classical principles to modern medical and technological phenomena as seen in recent responsa literature.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Money (1-0-1)

Course designed to increase student’s awareness of the need to protect financial assets of others. Laws and principles relevant to advertising , copyrights, damages, loans and deposits, lost objects, rentals, and stolen objects.

Course requirements: Regularly scheduled exams.

Laws of the Temple (1-1-2)

Legal analysis of specific practices related to Temple worship. Course designed to encourage students to prepare classic sources independently.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Laws of the Sabbath (2-0-2)

The development of electrical devices beginning in the 1800’s, advances in medicine, and the migration to large cities posed legal challenges to the Orthodox Jew. Turning on lights, use of microphones and elevators, use of an ambulance on the Sabbath, making an eruv in a large city… Course topics also include: preparing for the Sabbath, i.e. lighting candles, kiddush,…; business matters; touching forbidden items; work done by a non Jew.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

Laws of the Festivals (2-0-2)

An analysis of the laws of the Jewish Festivals with a special emphasis on those laws which relate to women. Course topics include: Pesach, Counting the Omer, Shavuos, Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, Sukkos, Chanukah, Purim.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

Jewish History (1-0-1)

The Who’s, What’s, Where’s, and When’s of Jewish history from the conclusion of the Talmud until the present era; the meaning of Jewish history in the construction of a Torah outlook on life; issues that have immediately shaped the lives of the modern day Jew including : 1. Shabtai Tzvi and his aftermath, 2. The use of the Yeshivot and the leading personalities in the movement, 3. Chassidut and its opponents, 4. Confrontation with modernity — Enlightenment, Reform, the Orthodox response., 5. the Holocaust, 6. political Zionism – ideological foundations, kulturkampf in Israel, 7. The American experience — the immigrant experience, the creation of an American orthodoxy.

Course requirements: Final exam or term paper per semester

Survey of Jewish Intellectual History (1-0-1)

A survey of periods in Jewish history against the background of movements, ideas, and personalities. Interaction with the surrounding civilizations and cultures. First semester focus on the period from the Second Commonwealth through the Talmudic and post-Talmudic period, the gaonic period until the Spanish Portuguese period. Second semester focus on the modern period beginning with the Spanish Portuguese expulsion.
Course requirements: Book reports and term paper.

Responsa from the Holocaust/ Modern Issues (1-0-1)

Course designed for students interested in participating in a tour of Eastern Europe to provide an appropriate religious and historical framework. Analysis of legal issues that arose in the era of the Holocaust as addressed to leading Rabbinic authorities. Students will also participate in a seminar on modern issues affecting the orthodox world of today.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

The Hassidic Movement (1-0-1)

The Hassidic Movement is an attempt to see beyond the external garb of Hassidim and into the inner world of Hassidut and the relevance of its teachings to the modern era.

The course first traces the origins of classical hassidic thought (by examining relevant passages in the Rambam and Messilat Yesharim) and then explores some of the main teachings of Hassidut: Emunah – faith, joy, the role of the righteous leader, Dveikut – attachment to G-d, etc.

TEXT: Source sheets.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Personalities and Ideologies (1-0-1)

Discussion of the ideals and achievements of great Jewish leaders of the previous three centuries.

Course requirements: One term paper per semester.

Leaders of the Twentieth Century (1-0-1)

Analysis of the impact of the Jewish intellectual leadership in the turbulent years of the past century. Course includes purview of classic works, personal stories of impact, and general historical information.

Advanced Jewish History (1-0-1)

First semester focus on a variety of responses to the breakdown of traditional Jewish society from the 18th century C.E.: Chassidism, the rise of the yeshivot, the Mussar movement.

Second semester focus on three contemporary topics: The American immigrant experience, the Holocaust and Zionism.

Course requirements: Final exam or term paper per semester.

The world of the Yeshiva (2-0-2)

The course is a historical perspective of the Yeshiva world in Eastern Europe starting from the late 1700’s. Emphasis on the biographies and modes of leadership of the Roshei Yeshiva. In depth study of the writings of the leaders discussed, and the writings as an implementation of specific educational systems.

Course requirements: Paper or exam per semester

Ulpan (2-0-2)

Focus on conversational Hebrew, daily vocabulary.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester

A Historical Perspective on the Geography of Israel (1-2-3)

Geography of the land; a Jew’s relationship with the land of Israel as seen in Talmudic literature; selective legal issues relating to the land.

Course requirements: Extensive field work, two written assignments per semester.

The Book of Numbers (2-0-2)

An exploration of the Book of Numbers through the eyes of the Talmud, the aggadah, and classical biblical commentaries including Rashi, Ibn Ezra and Ramban; includes the exposition of modern commentaries such as Ohr Hachaim, Rabbi S.R. Hirsch, the Meshech Chochma, and the Sfas Emes; major emphasis placed on careful analysis and comparison of the commentaries.

Course requirements: Test, term paper, final exam per semester.

Haftarot (2-0-2)

An in depth study of the Haftarot with an emphasis on literary analysis. Focus on the unique metaphors employed by the prophets and the distinguishing features of their respective personalities. Extensive analysis of classical commentaries and selections from rabbinic literature.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

The Five Megillot (2-0-2)

Texts of the Megillot studied with aggadic sources and classical commentaries; literary analysis; specific themes relevant to each megillah. Emphasis on the Books of Ruth, Esther, and Ecclesiastes.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

The Prophets: Cooperative Learning Exchange (0-5-4)

Students are divided into small groups and independently study specific portions of the first books of the Prophets with selected commentaries. Students then regroup and teach each other new material in a supervised setting. An optional weekly review session is available to provide guidance through the more difficult commentaries.

Course requirements: Regularly scheduled exams.

Nachmanides Commentary on the Five Books of Moses (0-1-1)

Selective citations from Nachmanides commentary on the Pentateuch highlighting his basic principles of philosophy and exegesis. The method and terminology of Moses Nachmanides (Ramban); similarities to, and differences from, other exegetes. 1 hour/week lecture. 1 hour/week individual study. tutorial aid available.

Course requirements: Two comprehensive exams per semester.

Gur Aryeh (1-0-1)

Research into Rashi’s approach to biblical exegesis; the Maharal’s analysis of Rashi’s sources.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

Shem Mishmuel (1-0-1)

Selected topics from the weekly portion of the Pentateuch highlighting the world view of the Sokatchover Rebbe.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Meshech Chochma, The Biblical Commentary of Rabbi Meir Simcha HaCohen (1-0-1)

An in depth study of selected citations in the biblical commentary of Rabbi Meir Simcha HaCohen M’Dvinsk. Focus on his commentary as a classic exposition of Jewish philosophy; examination of a timely biblical commentary reflecting issues relevant to the modern age.

Course Requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Jeremiah (2-0-2)

This course focuses on the times and teachings of Jeremiah the prophet, recorded by the prophet over two thousand years ago, yet stunningly relevant to us today. Intensive textual analysis guided by the commentaries composed throughout the past twenty centuries will enable the student to unlock the true messages of the “Prophet of Destruction”.

Course requirements: One term paper and one exam per semester.

Insights in the Weekly Torah Portion (1-0-1)

A collection of insights into the weekly Torah portion enabling the student to enhance her appreciation of the sedrah.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail. Attendance required.

Isaiah (1-0-1)

The tension and harmonization on the part of the prophet between love, comfort, and rebuke over the split between outer behavior and inner conscience. Holiness when the Temple stands and holiness when the Temple is in ruins.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

Bereishit (2-0-2)

Selected topics from the latter half of the book of Genesis, highlighting the relationship between Joseph and his brothers. Emphasis placed on literary and linguistic analysis. Includes selections from rabbinic literature and classical commentaries which shed light on the literary and linguistic difficulties.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester.

The Book of Psalms (2-0-2)

An analysis of the Book of Psalms as the ultimate expression of man’s relationship with G-d. The course emphasizes both basic interpretation and deeper messaged from select chapters of the Psalms.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

Trei Asar (Twelve Minor Prophets) (1-0-1)

Selections from the minor prophets including: Jonah, Hosea, and Malachi. Comparison of the different approaches taken by the rabbis, the classic medieval commentaries, and the Malbim.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

The Book Of Leviticus (2-0-2)

Sefer Vayikra has much to teach, yet many find it a “closed book.” This course “opens” the sefer by facing the issues of the sacrifices (elements, relevance, and symbolism), and by discovering the many lessons of life contained in the sefer.
Course topics include:
Symbolism in Jewish Law
Temple worship on the day of Atonement
Externals
Potential and Purity
Respect for others
Honesty
Rebuke-why, when, and how
Hairstyles
Old age

Course requirements: One exam per semester.

Selected Topics in the Bible (1-0-1)

In depth analysis of various outstanding biblical topics utilizing the Oral Tradition, medieval, and modern commentaries.

Course requirements: final exam per semester

The Book of Kings (2-0-2)

Course examines the roles of priest, king, prophet, and nation vis a vis their relationship with G-d and each other. Analysis of the differing approaches of the rabbis and the various commentaries.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

The Book of Job (1-1-2)

The Jewish view on pain and suffering with a focus of “why the righteous suffer” as illustrated in the Book of Job. Course designed as directed independent study to be followed by group lecture and discussion.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester

Topics in the Weekly Torah Portion (2-0-2)

Selected issues from the weekly Torah portion will be analyzed based on various classic medieval commentaries. Emphasis on topics which relate to a Jew’s weltanschauung and interrelationships with the world.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester

Prophets of the Second Commonwealth (1-0-1)

Course designed to delve into the historical era reflected in the prophets Chagai, Zecharia, and Malachi as Jews return to Israel from the Babylonian exile and rebuild the second Temple. Course based on the Books of Ezra and Nehemia.

Course requirements: Pass/fail course. Attendance required.

Topics in Genesis (2-0-2)

Analysis of different themes in Book of Genesis. Special emphasis on the conflict of Cain and Able and the birth of Ishmael.

Course requirements: Term paper or final exam per semester

Rabbeinu Bachya (1-0-1)

Selective citations from Bachya Ben Asher’s commentary on the Pentateuch which express the tension and harmony between Divine plan and concrete Jewish history. Personal character development, positive or negative as expressed through the central figures of biblical narrative.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester

The Five Megillot (2-0-2)

Texts of the Book of Lamentations and Song of Songs studied with aggadic sources and classical commentaries; literary analysis; specific themes relevant to each megillah.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester.

The Prophets: Cooperative Learning Exchange (0-5-4)

Students are divided into small groups and independently study specific portions of the first books of the Prophets with selected commentaries, as a continuation of BIB107;108. Students then regroup and teach each other new material in a supervised setting. An optional weekly review session is available to provide guidance through the more difficult commentaries.

Course requirements: Regularly scheduled exams.

Gur Aryeh II (1-0-1)

Continuation of BIB111;112. Research into Rashi’s approach to biblical exegesis; the Maharal’s analysis of Rashi’s sources.

Course requirements: Two exams per semester.

Shem Mishmuel II (1-0-1)

Continuation of BIB113;114. Selected topics from the weekly portion of the Pentateuch highlighting the world view of the Sokatchover Rebbe.

Course requirements: Pass/fail course. Attendance required.

Insights in the Weekly Torah Portion (1-0-1)

Continuation of BIB119;120. A collection of insights into the weekly Torah portion enabling the student to enhance her appreciation of the sedrah.

Course requirements: Pass/Fail course. Attendance required.

Bereishit II (2-0-2)

Continuation of BIB123;124. Textual analysis of the era of the latter patriarchs. In depth study of the verses as well as selections from rabbinic literature and classical commentaries which shed light on literary and linguistic difficulties.

Course requirements: Final exam per semester.

Selected Topics: Commentaries of the Malbim and Netziv (1-0-1)

Issues in the Bible highlighting the world-view of the Malbim and Netziv. Including: Creation, the Patriarch, the Exile, the Redemption, the giving of the Law, the Tabernacle, the Generation of the Desert.

Course requirements: One term paper per semester.

The Book of Deuteronomy (1-0-1)

A study of the special characteristics of the Book of Deuteronomy. An introduction to civil law according to the Torah. Topics to be included: The appointment of judges and judicial system; False Witnesses; Jewish law in private and communal life; The position of the Kohen (Priest), the King, the Prophet and the Judge; The Cities of Reception; Laws applicable to the waging of war; Eglah Arufah.

Course requirements: One exam per semester.

Bible Survey (3-1-4)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of the scope and sequence of the book of Numbers. Analysis of primary commentaries. Issues including – the unfaithful wife, the Nazirite, the spies, the red heifer.

Course requires independent preparation and presentation of information in a group forum.

Selected Topics in the Bible (1-0-1)

Continuation of BIB131;132. In depth analysis of various outstanding biblical topics utilizing the Oral Tradition, medieval, and modern commentaries.

Course Requirements: Final exam per semester.

Advanced Topics in the Weekly Torah Portion (2-0-2)

Continuation of BIB137;138.

Advanced Prophets of the Second Commonwealth (1-0-1)

Continuation of BIB139;140.

The Book of Samuel (2-0-2)

Selected topics from the Book of Samuel highlighting the changes in the leadership of the Jewish nation.

Course Requirements: Final exam per semester.

The Book of Ezekiel (2-0-2)

The course will examine the book of Ezekiel as a historical as well as philosophical text. Emphasis will be placed on the in depth study of commentaries, as well as contemporary sources to glean understanding and meaning for our lives. Students will be expected to prepare a chapter on their own, and present to the class.

Course Requirements: One exam per semester

Advanced Book of Psalms (2-0-2)

Continuation of BIB 125;126. An analysis of the Book of Psalms as the ultimate expression of man’s relationship with G-d. The course emphasizes both basic interpretation and deeper messages of select chapters of the Psalms.

Course requirements: Term paper per semester.

The Book of Daniel (2-0-2)

Advanced course expands upon the Academic text with focus on the messages of the exile as they are relevant for us today.

Stress on textual preparation.

Course requirements: